How to Write Seven Poems By the End of May

Hello Friends!

I wanted to invite you to What We Do, an online, two-week experience designed to help you generate new drafts before your gardens and summer schedules get the best of your attention.

WHAT WE DO is the outcome of numerous conversations about the challenge of writing in the midst of “real life”, quiet gestation, and my observation that many of you find it catalyzing to have some external structure around your writing life, maybe especially if you work full time, have kids, or feel stuck in your current practice.

Building on the popularity of my 21 Day Poetry Challenge, WHAT WE DO is geared toward poets who want to generate new drafts, energy and positive momentum during those times of year when “21” isn’t offered.

Lasting just two weeks, from May 12-25, this playful and generative experience will guide you toward a steady focus and more writing, followed by the satisfaction of having begun work that you can revise at whatever pace feels good to you, as summer unfolds.

Participants receive readings and writing provocations in their inbox every three days, and gentle guidance on how to approach this period as a true practice in being present to yourself and the work.

You can learn more and enroll by going here.

 

If you can commit an hour so, several days a week, for just two weeks, you can expect to have up to seven new poems in draft form by the end of May. Of course, you should feel free to work at your own pace, as all content is delivered directly to you, and won’t expire.

This short, sweet regimen is intended to be playful, pleasurable and liberating. No one will see your work in progress, so I hope you’ll try some new things in the free-space of your notebook.

We begin early Saturday morning, May 12, and I hope you will consider joining me. I know it will be fun.

Here’s what a participant in the winter session of What We Do said after her recent experience:

“I just finished Lesson 7 this week, and I thoroughly enjoyed the course. There are several “starts” I want to go back to and continue. Thanks, too, for your response to my question about finding line breaks and the unexpected within the text.” J.L., Winter 2018

 

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poetry matters. join the conversation.

join my community

SUBSCRIBE